Portland’s Fair Housing Act leads to subsidized segregation (is this legal?)


Originally posted on WILL BENNETT | Special Interests:

Portland’s Failure to supportFair Housing Actleads to subsidized segregation (is this legal?)

Portland’s Fair Housing Act leads to subsidized segregation

Locked Out The Oregonian’s Brad Schmidt spent months analyzing data and interviewing experts for this series on the failure of local governments and agencies to fulfill a fundamental goal of the nation’s 44-year-old Fair Housing Act: to give everyone, regardless of color, a fair shot at living in a decent neighborhood. Schmidt’s investigation found that taxpayer money meant to help break down segregation and poverty is instead reinforcing it. Housing is subsidized in the poorest neighborhoods and often in areas with above-average minority populations. And few poor people and people of color get to live in desirable communities such as inner Southeast Portland and Lake Oswego

VIDEO: Brad Schmidt on this series

The Oregonian met resistance in seeking public records for this series. Portland Housing Bureau…

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Five Dangers of Co-Signing


Originally posted on Ask Carolyn Warren:

co-sign Before you agree to be a co-signer for a friend or family member, consider the hidden dangers. By co-signing, you are not simply vouching for that person’s integrity. You are legally taking on responsibility for the loan yourself.

As a result, the debt and payment are yours in the eyes of a mortgage lender. The mortgage underwriter will calculate that payment into your debt ratio. This could easily prevent you from being able to buy the house you want. But hold on, there’s more…

Five Reasons Why Co-Signing is a Dangerous Move

1) No one can predict the future. What if the primary borrower gets hit with an illness and is hospitalized? What if he/she needs surgery and cannot work? What if the company they work for is sold or undergoes a restructure so that they are laid off work? What if they are a victim of identify theft?…

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OHSU, circa 1939


Originally posted on Vintage Portland:

Today we have an aerial view of southwest Portland overlooking OHSU. In this aerial you can also see SW Terwilliger Blvd., SW Barbur Blvd., SW Farmington Rd., Marquam Nature Park, and the upper portion of Duniway Park containing the lilac gardens.

Aerial of SW overlooking OHSU, circa 1939 : A2001-045.443

Aerial of SW overlooking OHSU, circa 1939 : A2001-045.443

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Portland Community College Cascade Campus, circa 1969


Originally posted on Vintage Portland:

Here we have an excellent aerial of what is now Portland Community College’s Cascade Campus located on N Killingsworth Street. The school began as a small Christian College which transferred its holdings to the entity that created PCC. The campus has transformed and expanded over the years since this photograph was taken, circa 1969. In the lower left corner you can see the Jefferson High School football field, and to the right of the field, the Multnomah County Library North Portland branch. In the upper left of the image you can see Ockley Green School and the defunct streetcar barns near N Jessup. In the upper right you can see the Peninsula Park Rose Garden.

Aerial view of Cascade Campus, circa 1969 : A2010-002.205

Aerial view of Cascade Campus, circa 1969 : A2010-002.205

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The Forestry Building, 1905


Originally posted on Vintage Portland:

Here we a have a picture of two women sitting in the upper balcony of the Forestry Building. This image really displays how massive the support logs were. Keep in mind, this image is from 1905. Imagine what they must have gone through during the constructions of this building. It is truly spectacular!

Two women on upper balcony of Forestry Building

Two women on upper balcony of Forestry Building, 1905 : 7200-03

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Is a 40-Year Mortgage Worth It? How to Decide Whether or Not This Longer Term is Right for You


Originally posted on neiljcoleman:

Is a 40-Year Mortgage Worth It? How to Decide Whether or Not This Longer Term is Right for YouThere are different timetables for mortgages. The most common types are 15-year and 30-year mortgages. However, a mortgage broker can establish unique timetables for a homeowner, such as a 40-year mortgage.

Friends may recommend going for a long-term timetable, but what do professionals think of a 40-year mortgage? Here is what you may want to consider to see if a 40-year mortgage is appropriate for you.

The Monthly Rates Will Be Low

Compared to a 15-year or a 30-year mortgage, the monthly payments for a 40-year mortgage will be lower. Since the mortgage is spread over 10 years beyond a conventional 30-year mortgage, homeowners will see much lower mortgage payments per month. This can be very attractive for homeowners who need to control their housing costs per month.

Long Term Costs

But, many brokers will tell a homeowner the extra 10 years is not worth it. Because the homeowner will…

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Generation Y is Ready to Buy


Originally posted on Avelina Colon:

Generation Y consists of men and women born between 1980 and 1995 and guess what? They are buying houses. Although they face some challenges like limited income, average credit and debt, they are the generation that is getting married and planting their roots.

Did you know:
  • Median Income: $73,600.00
  • Average Home Purchase Price: $180,000.00
  • Make up 31% of Recent Buyers

This generation definitely needs a loan officer on their side, finding them that perfect loan. I am ready to help this generation begin their home owning journey…..are you ready?

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