#RADONFREE Campaign


Eliot Neighborhood

Map of indoor radon risk levels for NE portland Radon Map

Environmental Works LLC is proud to be launching our #RADONFREE campaign! This campaign is a community service outreach program that helps Portland homeowners be informed about the dangers of radon and get their homes tested.

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How to Protect Yourself From Equifax Hackers


Ask Carolyn Warren

Equifax, one of the three big credit bureaus, announced that hackers have illegally accessed 143 million Americans’ private information. This security breach occurred between May and July and was discovered on July 29th. Equifax has said it will notify all victims, but if you’d like to be proactive, here are steps you can take (with caveats).

Protecting Your Online Security: Actions to Consider

  1. Send a letter through the good, old-fashioned USPS mail requesting a copy of your free annual credit report. Look for anything that should not belong there, such as a new account you did not open or a hard inquiry you did not authorize.
    Caveat: Do not order your credit report through the Internet, because in doing so, you would give up important legal rights.
  2. Enroll in Equifax’s one year free monitoring service.
    Caveat: They will not help you repair your credit, only monitor it.
    Second Caveat: By…

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A Tiny Complicated House


The Hermit in the Desert

Today I visited my first tiny house. I’ve been fascinated by these little homes for several years now, but this was my first time actually walking through out. I went with a friend of mine who, along with his wife, are also aficionados of simpler ways of life.

20170820_122929_resized-Tiny House

The new community is in the Northwest section of Charlotte, NC, well outside of the metro area. The community, if it comes to fruition, will exist across the street from an elementary school.

The first thing that struck both of us was how large the “tiny” house was, and this wasn’t even the large version of the model. The 493 square feet unit you see here begins at $89,950. But for only $14,000, you can add 100 sq. ft. For $20,160, you can add 144 sq. ft., and for a measly $23,800, you can add 170 sq. ft. I’m not sure if…

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Coming July 10, 2017: Tax Liens, Judgments Removed from Credit Reports, per New Federal Law


Ask Carolyn Warren

freedigitalphotos.net

A new federal law requires the credit bureaus (also called credit reporting agencies or CRAs) to remove tax liens and judgments from credit reports if they do not include the proper information identifying them to the individual.

It is estimated that 60% of tax lien information will be removed from credit reports and ALL civil judgment records will be removed!

A release from TransUnion gives some insight about what to expect:

  • Based on feedback, most Bankruptcy information will meet the minimum reporting requirements, so don’t expect those to go away.
  • The new standards will apply to both new and existing public record data.
  • Minimum identifier data required: Name, Address, Social Security # and/or Date of Birth
  • Minimum frequency courthouse visits to obtain newly filed data: 90 Days

When it will roll out: During the week of July 10, 2017, the CRAs will remove from their databases previously collected…

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GaSandra Carlson of Envoy Mortgage talks about the FHA 203 K Loan


GaSandra Carlson of Envoy Mortgage talks about the FHA 203 K Loan. This is a Rehab loan that allows buyers to buy a home that needs some work and borrow enough money to Rehab the home. This loan can also be used a tool to refinance and rehab your home/. After you watch this video. If you have any questions please feel free to contact GaSandra at (503) 967-5099

 

 

 

GaSandra Carlson
Sales Manager
NMLS # 487425
(503) 967-5099 Office
(503) 351-1802 Cell
www.GaSandraCarlson.com

 

 

Multnomah County Property Tax Appeal Process


This information will help you decide how to appeal your property value to the Board of Property Tax Appeals (BoPTA). Your appeal must be postmarked or delivered by December 31.

  1. Deciding to appeal
  2. Submit your appeal
  3. Prepare for your hearing
  4. What to expect at the hearing
  5. Hearing decision

Use this Glossary of Value Terms to help understand your tax bill and prepare your appeal.

Deciding to appeal

Before you file an appeal, please contact our office (via live chat(link is external), phone or email) for more information about how your property value was determined. Our appraisers will help you understand your value and if it should be adjusted.

You may file appeals for the following reasons:

  • Value: You can appeal the current year’s Real Market Value (RMV), Specially Assessed Value (SAV) or Assessed Value (AV) on both real and personal property accounts. Personal property includes business property, floating property and manufactured structures.
  • Exception event: If improvements have been made to your property (for example updating or remodeling) and you believe that the amount the Assessor has increased the value of your property is too high, you may appeal the amount of the increase that is associated with the improvements (called an “exception event”).
  • Penalty: If you disagree with a penalty assessed to you for late filing of your real or personal property return, you may petition BoPTA to waive the penalty.

When considering an appeal, keep in mind:

  • A reduction in Real Market Value of your property may not result in tax savings.
  • It is your responsibility to prove that the value the Assessor has placed on your property is too high.
  • BoPTA can only hear appeals of the current tax year values. It does not have authority to consider appeals for any other tax years.

BoPTA cannot:

  • Consider hardship as a factor in establishing value
  • Set the amount of tax you owe
  • Consider a sharp increase in value in a single year to be a valid reason for appeal
  • Regard lack of normal property maintenance as a reason for appeal (however, severely deferred maintenance and structural problems are considered)
  • Consider testimony on tax rates or the fairness of the tax system.

Submit your appeal

When can I appeal?

After your current year property tax statement is available, you have until December 31 to submit your petition to The Board of Property Tax Appeals (BoPTA). BoPTA can only consider petitions for the current tax year value.

Your petition must be postmarked or delivered by December 31.

  • We use the U.S. Postal Service postmark to determine timeliness of filing. A postage meter imprint (e.g. Pitney-Bowes) is not considered a postmark.

Hearings will take place between the first Monday in February through April 15. You will be notified by mail of your hearing date and time.

Download appeal forms and petitions

Pick up forms at our office

501 SE Hawthorne Blvd, Suite 175
Portland, OR 97214
Phone: 503.988.3326

Email form request to BOPTA@multco.us(link sends e-mail)

How do I submit my appeal and what is the fee?

You must submit a separate completed petition for each account. The filing fee is $30.00 per account.

If we receive your petition without the filing fee, you have 20 days from the date of notification to submit the fee or the petition will be dismissed.

Appeals are accepted by mail or in person only. Email or fax submissions are not accepted.

By mail

Board of Property Tax Appeals
PO Box 5007
Portland, OR 97208-5007

In person

501 SE Hawthorne Blvd, Suite 175
Portland, OR  97214

How do I appeal Business Personal Property?

Business Personal Property value for the current tax year may be appealed to BoPTA. Paperwork must be postmarked no later than December 31.

Late filing penalties for business personal property may also be appealed to BoPTA separately.

The cost for each appeal is $30.

Business Personal Property Appeals forms

Personal Property Petition (468.98 KB)

Waiver of Late Filing Penalty (152.42 KB)

Prepare for your hearing

When will my hearing be scheduled?

Hearings start in mid-February and run until April 15. Hearings take place in 10 minute increments from 9 am-2 pm, Monday-Thursday at the Multnomah Building (501 SE Hawthorne Blvd, Portland, OR 97214).

  • Notices of hearing will be mailed 5-10 days in advance of the scheduled time. You may also call or chat our Customer Service office(link is external) to find out your scheduled hearing time.
  • Hearing times cannot be rescheduled. If, after your hearing is scheduled, you find you cannot attend, you may send a qualified representative. To designate a representative, fill out and submit the Authorization to Represent form(link is external).
  • If you are in need of special assistance, please call or chat our office and we will be able to help you.

What evidence do I need?

Generally, to be successful in your appeal, you must provide evidence of the market value of your property on January 1 of the assessment year. A strong case requires careful preparation. Remember, it is your responsibility to prove that the Assessor’s value is too high.

The only evidence BoPTA can consider is what you provide with your current appeal.  Evidence from previous appeals will not be considered. You may send your evidence with your petition, or bring it at the time of the hearing.

Here are some examples of evidence BoPTA may consider:

  • Documentation of an arm’s-length (openly-marketed) sale of your property that occurred close to January 1 of the assessment year.
  • A fee appraisal dated close to January 1 of the assessment year which reflects the property’s value.
  • Proof that the property has been listed for sale on the open market for a reasonable period of time at a price below the real market value on the tax roll.
  • A comparison of properties similar to yours in location, size and quality that have sold close to January 1 of the assessment year. If there are differences between properties, the differences must be accounted for in the comparison of values.
  • Cost of new construction that occurred close to January 1 of the assessment year and was performed by a professional contractor.
  • Cost to repair your property. You must provide written estimates of the cost of the repairs.
  • For commercial property, documentation of income and expense information or a comparable sales analysis.

If you wish to submit comparable sales as evidence, an example of a Comparable Sales Grid is available.

Any evidence you provide to BoPTA will not be returned to you.  If you wish to keep the original documents, you may submit copies to the Board.

What to expect at the hearing

A typical residential hearing is limited to a total of 10 minutes. All hearings in which a petitioner (or representative) is present are recorded. Most recordings are available for review upon request. During this 10 minutes you will:

  • Introduce yourself and identify your property. The BoPTA Chair will announce the current value and your requested value, and will confirm the size, location and type of property under appeal.
  • You will then make a statement supporting your requested value.
  • Describe each piece of evidence you present. BoPTA members may ask questions during your presentation.

You must make your statement, present your evidence, and allow for questions within the 10 minute period. Remember that BoPTA is concerned with property values for the current assessment year, not large increases over last year’s value or increases in tax amounts.

The process is informal. You should expect to be treated with courtesy. The Chair must, however, adhere to the time schedule and you will be asked to cooperate in this regard.

Who is on the Board of Property Tax Appeals (BoPTA)?

BoPTA members are private citizens appointed by the Multnomah County Board of County Commissioners. They are not professional appraisers, but have training, experience and knowledge in property valuation.

BoPTA members are not part of the Assessor’s Office. BoPTA members are not part of the Assessor’s Office and they play no role in setting any of the values on your property.

BoPTA may be thought of as a panel which decides the value of your property based on the evidence you present.

Hearing decision

When can I expect a decision?

BoPTA hears all the day’s testimony before making any decisions. The decision-making process is typically between 2-4 pm. You are welcome to observe this process, however you will be unable to comment or offer any further testimony.

BoPTA’s decisions are not available by telephone.

Whether you are present for the decision-making process or not, a written Board order will be mailed to you or your representative within 8-10 business days after the hearing.

What if I disagree with the BoPTA’s decision?

Information and instructions on appealing BoPTA’s decision to the Oregon Tax Court will be included with the written decision.  For more information, visit the Oregon Tax Court’s website(link is external).