Bank-Owned Backlog Still Building, by Carole VanSickle, Bryan Ellis Real Estate News Letter


At present, banks and lenders own more than 872,000 homes in the United States today[1]. And that number, twice the number of REOs in 2007 and set to grow by around 1 million in the years ahead as current foreclosures move forward, is starting to make a lot of real estate professionals pretty nervous. Although home sales volumes are up, many experts fear that the growing backlog of foreclosures and the necessity of getting them off the balance sheets is going to create a “vicious cycle” of depressed home values that cannot make a recovery until the foreclosure backlog is reduced – and that could take many, many years as some forecasts predict that 2 million homes will be REO properties before the bottom truly hits.

Nationwide, Moody’s analytics predicts that the foreclosure backlog could take three more years to clear and that home values are likely to fall another 5 percent by the end of 2011. However, the firm predicts a “modest rise” in prices in 2012, which has some people thinking that the situation might not be quite as bleak as it seems. However, regional analysis is going to be more important than ever before for real estate investors. For example, while hardest hit areas like Phoenix and Las Vegas are finally starting to work through their backlogs as prices get so low that buyers – both investors and would-be homeowners – can no longer resist, real estate data firm RealtyTrac recently released numbers indicating that New York’s foreclosure backlog will take more than seven years to clear[2]. Currently, it takes an average of 900 days for a property to move through the state judicial system. This means that while New York City may be, as some residents and real estate agents insist, impervious to real estate woes, the state market could suffer mightily in the years to come as those foreclosures slog through the system.

Do you think that a 5 percent drop in price in the coming year followed by “modest gains” sounds terrible, or does that just get you in the mood to buy?

Bryan Ellis Real Estate Blog
http://realestate.bryanellis.com

Fannie Mae Homepath Review, by Thetruthaboutmortgage.com


Government mortgage financier Fannie Mae offers special home loan financing via its “HomePath” program, so let’s take a closer look.

In short, a HomePath mortgage allows prospective homebuyers to get their hands on a Fannie Mae-owned property (foreclosure) for as little down as three percent down.

And that down payment can be in the form of a gift, a grant, or a loan from a nonprofit organization, state or local government, or an employer.

This compares to the minimum 3.5 percent down payment required with an FHA loan.

HomePath financing comes in the form of fixed mortgages, adjustable-rate mortgages, and even interest-only options!

Another big plus associated with HomePath financing is that there is no lender-required appraisal or mortgage insurance.

Typically, private mortgage insurance is required for mortgages with a loan-to-value ratio over 80 percent, so this is a pretty good deal.

HomePath® Buyer Incentive

Fannie Mae is also currently offering buyers up to 3.5 percent in closing cost assistance through June 30, 2011.

But only those who plan to use the property as their primary residence as eligible – second homes and investment properties are excluded.

Finally, many condominium projects don’t meet Fannie’s guidelines, but if the condo you’re interested in is owned by Fannie Mae, it may be available for financing via HomePath.

Note that most large mortgage lenders, such as Citi or Wells Fargo, are “HomePath Mortgage Lenders,” meaning they can offer you the loan program.

Additionally, some of these lenders work with mortgage brokers, so you can go that route as well.

Final Word

In summary, HomePath might be a good alternative to purchasing a foreclosure through the open market.

And with flexible down payment requirements and no mortgage insurance or lender-required appraisal, you could save some serious cash.

So HomePath properties and corresponding financing should certainly be considered alongside other options.

But similar to other foreclosures, these homes are sold as-is, meaning repairs may be needed, which you will be responsible for. So tread cautiously.