Multnomah County Property Tax Appeal Process


This information will help you decide how to appeal your property value to the Board of Property Tax Appeals (BoPTA). Your appeal must be postmarked or delivered by December 31.

  1. Deciding to appeal
  2. Submit your appeal
  3. Prepare for your hearing
  4. What to expect at the hearing
  5. Hearing decision

Use this Glossary of Value Terms to help understand your tax bill and prepare your appeal.

Deciding to appeal

Before you file an appeal, please contact our office (via live chat(link is external), phone or email) for more information about how your property value was determined. Our appraisers will help you understand your value and if it should be adjusted.

You may file appeals for the following reasons:

  • Value: You can appeal the current year’s Real Market Value (RMV), Specially Assessed Value (SAV) or Assessed Value (AV) on both real and personal property accounts. Personal property includes business property, floating property and manufactured structures.
  • Exception event: If improvements have been made to your property (for example updating or remodeling) and you believe that the amount the Assessor has increased the value of your property is too high, you may appeal the amount of the increase that is associated with the improvements (called an “exception event”).
  • Penalty: If you disagree with a penalty assessed to you for late filing of your real or personal property return, you may petition BoPTA to waive the penalty.

When considering an appeal, keep in mind:

  • A reduction in Real Market Value of your property may not result in tax savings.
  • It is your responsibility to prove that the value the Assessor has placed on your property is too high.
  • BoPTA can only hear appeals of the current tax year values. It does not have authority to consider appeals for any other tax years.

BoPTA cannot:

  • Consider hardship as a factor in establishing value
  • Set the amount of tax you owe
  • Consider a sharp increase in value in a single year to be a valid reason for appeal
  • Regard lack of normal property maintenance as a reason for appeal (however, severely deferred maintenance and structural problems are considered)
  • Consider testimony on tax rates or the fairness of the tax system.

Submit your appeal

When can I appeal?

After your current year property tax statement is available, you have until December 31 to submit your petition to The Board of Property Tax Appeals (BoPTA). BoPTA can only consider petitions for the current tax year value.

Your petition must be postmarked or delivered by December 31.

  • We use the U.S. Postal Service postmark to determine timeliness of filing. A postage meter imprint (e.g. Pitney-Bowes) is not considered a postmark.

Hearings will take place between the first Monday in February through April 15. You will be notified by mail of your hearing date and time.

Download appeal forms and petitions

Pick up forms at our office

501 SE Hawthorne Blvd, Suite 175
Portland, OR 97214
Phone: 503.988.3326

Email form request to BOPTA@multco.us(link sends e-mail)

How do I submit my appeal and what is the fee?

You must submit a separate completed petition for each account. The filing fee is $30.00 per account.

If we receive your petition without the filing fee, you have 20 days from the date of notification to submit the fee or the petition will be dismissed.

Appeals are accepted by mail or in person only. Email or fax submissions are not accepted.

By mail

Board of Property Tax Appeals
PO Box 5007
Portland, OR 97208-5007

In person

501 SE Hawthorne Blvd, Suite 175
Portland, OR  97214

How do I appeal Business Personal Property?

Business Personal Property value for the current tax year may be appealed to BoPTA. Paperwork must be postmarked no later than December 31.

Late filing penalties for business personal property may also be appealed to BoPTA separately.

The cost for each appeal is $30.

Business Personal Property Appeals forms

Personal Property Petition (468.98 KB)

Waiver of Late Filing Penalty (152.42 KB)

Prepare for your hearing

When will my hearing be scheduled?

Hearings start in mid-February and run until April 15. Hearings take place in 10 minute increments from 9 am-2 pm, Monday-Thursday at the Multnomah Building (501 SE Hawthorne Blvd, Portland, OR 97214).

  • Notices of hearing will be mailed 5-10 days in advance of the scheduled time. You may also call or chat our Customer Service office(link is external) to find out your scheduled hearing time.
  • Hearing times cannot be rescheduled. If, after your hearing is scheduled, you find you cannot attend, you may send a qualified representative. To designate a representative, fill out and submit the Authorization to Represent form(link is external).
  • If you are in need of special assistance, please call or chat our office and we will be able to help you.

What evidence do I need?

Generally, to be successful in your appeal, you must provide evidence of the market value of your property on January 1 of the assessment year. A strong case requires careful preparation. Remember, it is your responsibility to prove that the Assessor’s value is too high.

The only evidence BoPTA can consider is what you provide with your current appeal.  Evidence from previous appeals will not be considered. You may send your evidence with your petition, or bring it at the time of the hearing.

Here are some examples of evidence BoPTA may consider:

  • Documentation of an arm’s-length (openly-marketed) sale of your property that occurred close to January 1 of the assessment year.
  • A fee appraisal dated close to January 1 of the assessment year which reflects the property’s value.
  • Proof that the property has been listed for sale on the open market for a reasonable period of time at a price below the real market value on the tax roll.
  • A comparison of properties similar to yours in location, size and quality that have sold close to January 1 of the assessment year. If there are differences between properties, the differences must be accounted for in the comparison of values.
  • Cost of new construction that occurred close to January 1 of the assessment year and was performed by a professional contractor.
  • Cost to repair your property. You must provide written estimates of the cost of the repairs.
  • For commercial property, documentation of income and expense information or a comparable sales analysis.

If you wish to submit comparable sales as evidence, an example of a Comparable Sales Grid is available.

Any evidence you provide to BoPTA will not be returned to you.  If you wish to keep the original documents, you may submit copies to the Board.

What to expect at the hearing

A typical residential hearing is limited to a total of 10 minutes. All hearings in which a petitioner (or representative) is present are recorded. Most recordings are available for review upon request. During this 10 minutes you will:

  • Introduce yourself and identify your property. The BoPTA Chair will announce the current value and your requested value, and will confirm the size, location and type of property under appeal.
  • You will then make a statement supporting your requested value.
  • Describe each piece of evidence you present. BoPTA members may ask questions during your presentation.

You must make your statement, present your evidence, and allow for questions within the 10 minute period. Remember that BoPTA is concerned with property values for the current assessment year, not large increases over last year’s value or increases in tax amounts.

The process is informal. You should expect to be treated with courtesy. The Chair must, however, adhere to the time schedule and you will be asked to cooperate in this regard.

Who is on the Board of Property Tax Appeals (BoPTA)?

BoPTA members are private citizens appointed by the Multnomah County Board of County Commissioners. They are not professional appraisers, but have training, experience and knowledge in property valuation.

BoPTA members are not part of the Assessor’s Office. BoPTA members are not part of the Assessor’s Office and they play no role in setting any of the values on your property.

BoPTA may be thought of as a panel which decides the value of your property based on the evidence you present.

Hearing decision

When can I expect a decision?

BoPTA hears all the day’s testimony before making any decisions. The decision-making process is typically between 2-4 pm. You are welcome to observe this process, however you will be unable to comment or offer any further testimony.

BoPTA’s decisions are not available by telephone.

Whether you are present for the decision-making process or not, a written Board order will be mailed to you or your representative within 8-10 business days after the hearing.

What if I disagree with the BoPTA’s decision?

Information and instructions on appealing BoPTA’s decision to the Oregon Tax Court will be included with the written decision.  For more information, visit the Oregon Tax Court’s website(link is external).

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Interview with Jake Planton of Rose City Mortgage


 

 

 

 

Jake Planton
Senior Loan Officer
Rose City Mortgage, NMLS 272695
503-475-3788

www.JakePlanton.com

NMLS #209327


http://www.rosecitymtg.com

 

 

 

Piedmont Neighborhood on a Winters Day


 

 

 













FHA EASES CONDOMINIUM PROJECT APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS: Temporary guidelines will increase number of condominium projects eligible for FHA approval


WASHINGTON – The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) today published new guidelines under its condominium approval process intended to increase affordable housing options for first-time and low- to moderate-income homebuyers.  Effective immediately, FHA’s temporary guidance will streamline the agency’s condominium recertification process and expand the eligibility of acceptable ‘owner-occupied’ units to include second homes that are not investor-owned.    Read FHA’s mortgagee letter.

These provisions will expire in one year and serve to revise FHA’s condominium approval process until the agency can implement a more comprehensive condominium rule change.  Today’s guidance:

  1. Modifies the requirements for condominium project recertification;
  2. Revises the calculation of FHA’s required owner-occupancy percentage; and
  3. Expands eligible condominium project insurance coverages.

Streamline Condominium Recertification

FHA-approved condominium projects require recertification after two years to ensure that the project is still in compliance with FHA’s eligibility requirements and that no conditions currently exist which would present an unacceptable risk to FHA.  For existing condominium projects seeking recertification, FHA will now only require applicants to submit documents reflecting any substantive changes since the project’s prior approval.

Calculation of Owner-Occupancy

The procedure for calculating the required owner-occupancy percentage (50 percent) is modified to allow units that are not investor-owned to be considered owner-occupied for the purpose of Condominium Project approval.  A condominium is considered to be owner-occupied provided they are not:

  • Tenant Occupied;
  • Vacant and listed for rent;
  • Existing (previously occupied), vacant and listed for sale; or
  • Under contract to a purchaser who does not intend to occupy the unit as a Principal Residence or Secondary Residence.  The term Principal Residence and Secondary Residence have the same meaning.

Expansion of Eligible Condominium Project Insurance Coverage

Homeowners’ Associations (HOAs) are required to maintain adequate “master” or “blanket” property insurance in an amount equal to 100% of current replacement cost of the condominium (exclusive of land, foundation, excavation and other items normally excluded from coverage). Insurance coverage for condominium project approval that consists of pooled policies for affiliated projects, state-run plans, or contains coinsurance obligations on the part of the policy holder is now permitted to satisfy this requirement.

 

 

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HUD’s mission is to create strong, sustainable, inclusive communities and quality affordable homes for all.
More information about HUD and its programs is available on the Internet
at www.hud.gov and http://espanol.hud.gov.

You can also connect with HUD on social media and follow Secretary Castro on
Twitter and Facebook or sign up for news alerts on HUD’s Email List.

 

Three Tips for Reducing Your Closing Costs if You’re Looking Forward To Buying a Home in the Spring


Spring is approaching fast and it is usually the busiest time of the year for home buying. After a long and cold winter, many people are ready to enjoy the nicer weather and begin to shop for a new home. Spring is also the perfect time for home buying for families with children because it allows them to move during the summer without interrupting school.

Home buying has costs associated with it other than the mortgage itself. Known as closing costs, these fees are a part of the home buying process and they are due at the time that the mortgage is finalized. Buyers, however, can negotiate these costs and reduce the expense with a little bit of effort and with the help of a good mortgage professional.

If you are thinking of buying a new home in the spring here are three helpful tips to reducing your closing costs.

Compare All of Your Mortgage Options

If you’re using mortgage financing to cover some of the up-front purchase cost of your home you’ll have other closing costs to pay including lender fees, mortgage insurance and more. Be sure to compare all of your options with your trusted mortgage adviser to ensure that you’re getting the best possible deal and paying the least amount in fees and interest.

You may also be able to save a bit on your closing costs by choosing a “no points” mortgage. In this type of mortgage you’ll end up saving on closing costs but you’ll be left paying a higher interest rate. Spend a bit of time doing the math to determine the best course of action.

Third Party Fees

Some of the closing cost fees will be associated with third party vendors that must perform required services. Home appraisals, title searches, and costs for obtaining credit reports are some of the items included in this area. While these may be a little harder to negotiate because the lender uses specific companies to perform these services, it does not hurt to ask if you can use your own appraiser or title search company.

Zero Closing Cost Mortgages

Buyers may also wish to inquire about a no closing cost mortgage. This type of mortgage eliminates all closing costs. The lender covers all of the closing cost fees in exchange or a slightly higher interest rate on the loan. In most cases the increase is less than one-quarter of a percent. This type of loan can be very helpful to buyers. Buyers can then use the money that they saved on closing costs to help with the move.

With a little preparation, you can find the best mortgage product for the up-coming spring season. Be sure to contact your experienced mortgage professional, as they will be able to help you find the right mortgage for your specific needs with the lowest out-of-pocket expenses.

Looking to Pay Back Your Mortgage Faster? Three Reasons to Consider Switching to Bi-weekly Payments, by Steph Nobel, Stephnoblemortgageblog.com


While there are differing schools of thought when it comes to whether or not a person should pay off a mortgage before the loan term ends, there may be some benefits to making payments on a bi-weekly basis as opposed to monthly basis. What are some of the reasons why it may be beneficial to make two payments a month instead of one? Here are three reasons why you should ditch the monthly fees and make payments once every two weeks.

You’ll Make An Extra Payment Per Year

If you’re looking to pay off your mortgage ahead of schedule, making bi-weekly payments means you’ll make an extra payment every year. Instead of making 12 large payments every year, you’ll make 26 small payments. These 26 small payments would be equal to about 13 large payments.

This is the equivalent of an extra payment per year and 10 extra payments over 10 years. If you have a 30-year mortgage, you could pay it off between two and three years early because you will make your last payment 30 months ahead of schedule.

You’ll Provide Yourself With Financial Flexibility

Making extra payments can provide you with financial flexibility that makes it easier to deal with unexpected expenses or a job loss. As you are making a half-payment every two week, you can make your payments in smaller, more manageable chunks.

It may be a good thing if you are self-employed and may not be sure when a client will pay for services rendered. Additionally, you may have your next payment reduced or advanced if you pay more than you owe in a given month.

You’ll Reduce the Amount of Interest Paid on the Loan

Paying off your mortgage faster reduces the amount of interest that you pay on the loan. Even if you only make one extra payment per year, you could still save thousands of dollars in interest by paying your loan several months or years early.

To determine exactly how much you will save, you can use an amortization table or calculator to see how much interest you pay over the full 30 years as opposed to taking only 27 or 28 years to pay for your home. It is also important to note that making extra payments adds to the equity that you have in the home.

Making two payments instead of one each month may help you achieve financial flexibility while building equity in your home. By paying off your mortgage as soon as possible, it may enable you to put more money into a savings or retirement account. Contact a mortgage professional for more information about whether bi-weekly payments are right for you.

 

 

 

 

Steph Noble
http://stephnoblemortgageblog.com

Utility Issues with Rental Properties, by Troy Rappold, Rappold Property Management


When a rental property that is occupied by a tenant is sold to a new owner there are many details that require diligent attention. One of these areas is the utility billing and interim billing. Interim billing is one of the first things that you would want to cancel because an Owner doesn’t want to accidently pay for bill that isn’t their responsibility. This ensures proper and accurate billing. As a general rule, the tenant is responsible for all utilities for a single family home. In this case nothing changes if ownership changes and the tenant stays in place.  If the house is located in a city where the population is over 100K, the owner is responsible for the garbage service. In this case, the garbage bill is changed to the name of the new Owner.

 

As a local property management company, we have the garbage bills mailed to our office and we pay it out of the rental income on behalf of the owner. That way the charge will be reflected on the monthly statement. This is important because this expense is a tax write-off for the home owner. If the new Owner is going to move into the property, and the tenant is going to move out, then all utilities will be a prorated amount based upon the move out date of the tenant. If the tenant moves out on the 18th of the month, then they are responsible for 18 days’ worth of electricity, water, sewer, garbage and natural gas. As the property management company for the house, we track this and make sure all these charges are distributed correctly.

 

We also manage condominiums and often times the owner/investor will pay the Condo Association fees that include water, sewer and garbage. These charges are also a tax write off and can be tracked for the year. Although none of this is difficult to manage, it does need to be watched carefully so all parties involved pay only their share. This careful attention to detail is what we do here at Rappold Property Management.

 

Rappold Property Management, LLC

1125 SE Madison Street, suite #201

Portland, OR 97214

Phone: 503-232-5990

Fax: 503-232-1462