Multnomah County Property Tax Appeal Process


This information will help you decide how to appeal your property value to the Board of Property Tax Appeals (BoPTA). Your appeal must be postmarked or delivered by December 31.

  1. Deciding to appeal
  2. Submit your appeal
  3. Prepare for your hearing
  4. What to expect at the hearing
  5. Hearing decision

Use this Glossary of Value Terms to help understand your tax bill and prepare your appeal.

Deciding to appeal

Before you file an appeal, please contact our office (via live chat(link is external), phone or email) for more information about how your property value was determined. Our appraisers will help you understand your value and if it should be adjusted.

You may file appeals for the following reasons:

  • Value: You can appeal the current year’s Real Market Value (RMV), Specially Assessed Value (SAV) or Assessed Value (AV) on both real and personal property accounts. Personal property includes business property, floating property and manufactured structures.
  • Exception event: If improvements have been made to your property (for example updating or remodeling) and you believe that the amount the Assessor has increased the value of your property is too high, you may appeal the amount of the increase that is associated with the improvements (called an “exception event”).
  • Penalty: If you disagree with a penalty assessed to you for late filing of your real or personal property return, you may petition BoPTA to waive the penalty.

When considering an appeal, keep in mind:

  • A reduction in Real Market Value of your property may not result in tax savings.
  • It is your responsibility to prove that the value the Assessor has placed on your property is too high.
  • BoPTA can only hear appeals of the current tax year values. It does not have authority to consider appeals for any other tax years.

BoPTA cannot:

  • Consider hardship as a factor in establishing value
  • Set the amount of tax you owe
  • Consider a sharp increase in value in a single year to be a valid reason for appeal
  • Regard lack of normal property maintenance as a reason for appeal (however, severely deferred maintenance and structural problems are considered)
  • Consider testimony on tax rates or the fairness of the tax system.

Submit your appeal

When can I appeal?

After your current year property tax statement is available, you have until December 31 to submit your petition to The Board of Property Tax Appeals (BoPTA). BoPTA can only consider petitions for the current tax year value.

Your petition must be postmarked or delivered by December 31.

  • We use the U.S. Postal Service postmark to determine timeliness of filing. A postage meter imprint (e.g. Pitney-Bowes) is not considered a postmark.

Hearings will take place between the first Monday in February through April 15. You will be notified by mail of your hearing date and time.

Download appeal forms and petitions

Pick up forms at our office

501 SE Hawthorne Blvd, Suite 175
Portland, OR 97214
Phone: 503.988.3326

Email form request to BOPTA@multco.us(link sends e-mail)

How do I submit my appeal and what is the fee?

You must submit a separate completed petition for each account. The filing fee is $30.00 per account.

If we receive your petition without the filing fee, you have 20 days from the date of notification to submit the fee or the petition will be dismissed.

Appeals are accepted by mail or in person only. Email or fax submissions are not accepted.

By mail

Board of Property Tax Appeals
PO Box 5007
Portland, OR 97208-5007

In person

501 SE Hawthorne Blvd, Suite 175
Portland, OR  97214

How do I appeal Business Personal Property?

Business Personal Property value for the current tax year may be appealed to BoPTA. Paperwork must be postmarked no later than December 31.

Late filing penalties for business personal property may also be appealed to BoPTA separately.

The cost for each appeal is $30.

Business Personal Property Appeals forms

Personal Property Petition (468.98 KB)

Waiver of Late Filing Penalty (152.42 KB)

Prepare for your hearing

When will my hearing be scheduled?

Hearings start in mid-February and run until April 15. Hearings take place in 10 minute increments from 9 am-2 pm, Monday-Thursday at the Multnomah Building (501 SE Hawthorne Blvd, Portland, OR 97214).

  • Notices of hearing will be mailed 5-10 days in advance of the scheduled time. You may also call or chat our Customer Service office(link is external) to find out your scheduled hearing time.
  • Hearing times cannot be rescheduled. If, after your hearing is scheduled, you find you cannot attend, you may send a qualified representative. To designate a representative, fill out and submit the Authorization to Represent form(link is external).
  • If you are in need of special assistance, please call or chat our office and we will be able to help you.

What evidence do I need?

Generally, to be successful in your appeal, you must provide evidence of the market value of your property on January 1 of the assessment year. A strong case requires careful preparation. Remember, it is your responsibility to prove that the Assessor’s value is too high.

The only evidence BoPTA can consider is what you provide with your current appeal.  Evidence from previous appeals will not be considered. You may send your evidence with your petition, or bring it at the time of the hearing.

Here are some examples of evidence BoPTA may consider:

  • Documentation of an arm’s-length (openly-marketed) sale of your property that occurred close to January 1 of the assessment year.
  • A fee appraisal dated close to January 1 of the assessment year which reflects the property’s value.
  • Proof that the property has been listed for sale on the open market for a reasonable period of time at a price below the real market value on the tax roll.
  • A comparison of properties similar to yours in location, size and quality that have sold close to January 1 of the assessment year. If there are differences between properties, the differences must be accounted for in the comparison of values.
  • Cost of new construction that occurred close to January 1 of the assessment year and was performed by a professional contractor.
  • Cost to repair your property. You must provide written estimates of the cost of the repairs.
  • For commercial property, documentation of income and expense information or a comparable sales analysis.

If you wish to submit comparable sales as evidence, an example of a Comparable Sales Grid is available.

Any evidence you provide to BoPTA will not be returned to you.  If you wish to keep the original documents, you may submit copies to the Board.

What to expect at the hearing

A typical residential hearing is limited to a total of 10 minutes. All hearings in which a petitioner (or representative) is present are recorded. Most recordings are available for review upon request. During this 10 minutes you will:

  • Introduce yourself and identify your property. The BoPTA Chair will announce the current value and your requested value, and will confirm the size, location and type of property under appeal.
  • You will then make a statement supporting your requested value.
  • Describe each piece of evidence you present. BoPTA members may ask questions during your presentation.

You must make your statement, present your evidence, and allow for questions within the 10 minute period. Remember that BoPTA is concerned with property values for the current assessment year, not large increases over last year’s value or increases in tax amounts.

The process is informal. You should expect to be treated with courtesy. The Chair must, however, adhere to the time schedule and you will be asked to cooperate in this regard.

Who is on the Board of Property Tax Appeals (BoPTA)?

BoPTA members are private citizens appointed by the Multnomah County Board of County Commissioners. They are not professional appraisers, but have training, experience and knowledge in property valuation.

BoPTA members are not part of the Assessor’s Office. BoPTA members are not part of the Assessor’s Office and they play no role in setting any of the values on your property.

BoPTA may be thought of as a panel which decides the value of your property based on the evidence you present.

Hearing decision

When can I expect a decision?

BoPTA hears all the day’s testimony before making any decisions. The decision-making process is typically between 2-4 pm. You are welcome to observe this process, however you will be unable to comment or offer any further testimony.

BoPTA’s decisions are not available by telephone.

Whether you are present for the decision-making process or not, a written Board order will be mailed to you or your representative within 8-10 business days after the hearing.

What if I disagree with the BoPTA’s decision?

Information and instructions on appealing BoPTA’s decision to the Oregon Tax Court will be included with the written decision.  For more information, visit the Oregon Tax Court’s website(link is external).

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Property Tax Deferral for Seniors and People with Disabilities


 

What is a property tax deferral?

The Oregon Legislature established programs that allow qualifying citizens to delay paying property taxes on their residences – including manufactured homes, houseboats, multi-family, and income-producing properties.

If you qualify for one of the deferral programs, the state will pay your property taxes to the county. A lien will be placed on your property. You will be charged lien recording fees, which are deferred. Interest on the deferred taxes, at 6 percent per year, is also deferred.

How do I qualify for a deferral?

To get more detailed information about how to qualify for a property tax deferral through the Oregon Department of Revenue, visit: Property Tax Deferral for Disabled and Senior Citizens.

 

Disabled and senior citizens can “borrow” money from the state of Oregon to pay property taxes. 

 

Interview with Jeff Foody of Reverse Mortgages Northwest


Jeff Foody answers some important questions regarding Reverse Mortgages.   Reverse Mortgages is not for everyone, but for those that need its flexibilities it can be a life-changing opportunity.    It is important that people that seeks a Reverse Mortgage work with Loan Officers that understand the  loan product as much as Jeff Foody does and that will not be easy.    After watching this video if you still have questions please feel free to contact Jeff .  I am sure he will be able to answer your questions and help you learn if this loan product is good fo your situation or not.

 

 

 

Jeff Foody
Reverse Mortgage North West
503-427-1667
http://www.reversenorthwest.com

Asking Prices and Inventory for Homes in Portland Oregon June 3rd 2013


As of June 03 2013 there were about 8,714 single family and condo homes listed for sale in Portland Oregon. The median asking price of these homes was approximately $285,077. Since this time last year, the inventory of homes for sale has decreased by 23.4% and the median price has increased by 10.1%.

June 03, 2013 Month/Month Year/Year
Median Asking Price $285,077 +1.8% +10.1%
Home Listings/Inventory 8,714 +3.5% -23.4%

Recent Asking Price and Inventory History for Portland

Date Single Family & Condo
Inventory
25th Percentile
Asking Price
Median
Asking Price
75th Percentile
Asking Price
06/03/2013 8,714 $199,000 $285,077 $449,900
05/27/2013 8,631 $197,700 $285,000 $449,000
05/20/2013 8,597 $195,000 $282,500 $441,100
05/13/2013 8,460 $194,950 $280,000 $448,500
05/06/2013 8,420 $191,900 $279,900 $449,000

Portland Asking Price History

The median asking price for homes in Portland peaked in April 2007 at $354,740 and is now $69,663 (19.6%) lower. From a low of $239,125 in February 2011, the median asking price in Portland has increased by $45,952 (19.2%).

25th, Median (50th) and 75th Percentile Asking Prices for Portland Oregon

Portland Housing Inventory History

Housing inventory in Portland, which is typically highest in the spring/summer and lowest in the fall/winter, peaked at 23,354 in July 2008. The lowest housing inventory level seen was 7,969 in March 2013.

Housing Inventory for Portland Oregon

Portland Asking Price and Inventory History

Date Single Family & Condo
Inventory
25th Percentile
Asking Price
Median
Asking Price
75th Percentile
Asking Price
June 2013 8,714 $199,000 $285,077 $449,900
May 2013 8,527 $194,888 $281,850 $446,900
April 2013 8,075 $186,800 $274,540 $439,060
March 2013 7,969 $182,923 $267,425 $427,213
February 2013 7,981 $179,900 $262,450 $419,731
January 2013 8,250 $179,075 $259,217 $404,725
December 2012 8,627 $178,900 $259,720 $405,750
November 2012 9,408 $179,675 $260,950 $408,963
October 2012 10,259 $179,900 $267,160 $418,600
September 2012 10,828 $179,900 $268,975 $418,450
August 2012 11,102 $179,675 $268,725 $418,500
July 2012 11,140 $177,600 $266,598 $411,651
June 2012 11,362 $174,825 $259,675 $399,950
May 2012 11,227 $169,713 $252,463 $399,450
April 2012 10,820 $169,160 $249,910 $397,940
March 2012 9,683 $174,450 $259,450 $406,225
February 2012 10,549 $169,225 $248,250 $388,025
January 2012 10,833 $169,080 $246,960 $381,960
December 2011 11,461 $169,925 $248,375 $385,675
November 2011 12,018 $174,750 $250,972 $397,425
October 2011 12,846 $179,530 $258,720 $399,900
September 2011 13,509 $179,939 $259,900 $399,900
August 2011 14,672 $179,360 $256,590 $395,540
July 2011 14,772 $178,150 $253,188 $389,225
June 2011 14,762 $176,475 $250,970 $386,970
May 2011 14,582 $173,184 $249,160 $375,780
April 2011 14,748 $169,950 $242,400 $364,975
March 2011 15,458 $169,800 $239,675 $359,575
February 2011 15,531 $169,675 $239,125 $354,725
January 2011 15,001 $170,760 $239,158 $356,380
December 2010 16,118 $176,200 $242,700 $363,363
November 2010 17,018 $180,160 $249,330 $373,780
October 2010 17,614 $184,975 $253,375 $381,975
September 2010 18,282 $189,100 $258,925 $390,950
August 2010 18,579 $190,940 $261,150 $397,160
July 2010 18,160 $195,163 $267,475 $399,000
June 2010 17,488 $196,853 $268,875 $399,800
May 2010 17,035 $198,880 $269,620 $399,818
April 2010 17,279 $198,000 $266,750 $392,500
March 2010 16,495 $195,600 $264,460 $393,960
February 2010 15,382 $194,938 $264,450 $395,198
January 2010 14,895 $197,819 $267,425 $399,225
December 2009 15,329 $199,897 $272,038 $402,212
November 2009 15,902 $202,750 $277,760 $417,780
October 2009 16,573 $209,675 $283,646 $428,225
September 2009 17,165 $210,000 $289,475 $436,100
August 2009 17,595 $211,760 $292,880 $444,320
July 2009 17,819 $212,950 $294,950 $449,000
June 2009 17,870 $213,460 $294,920 $449,100
May 2009 17,713 $211,475 $293,291 $445,250
April 2009 17,978 $212,525 $289,925 $444,725
March 2009 18,506 $214,153 $289,930 $443,360
February 2009 18,449 $216,014 $293,968 $448,125
January 2009 18,872 $219,952 $297,855 $452,809
December 2008 19,842 $223,220 $302,773 $458,508
November 2008 20,983 $226,382 $307,532 $464,024
October 2008 22,086 $229,650 $312,450 $469,724
September 2008 22,973 $233,730 $319,580 $474,990
August 2008 23,314 $235,200 $322,000 $475,725
July 2008 23,354 $236,074 $324,550 $475,000
June 2008 22,657 $239,150 $324,920 $479,459
May 2008 21,505 $239,900 $325,000 $480,947
April 2008 20,669 $239,900 $324,937 $479,912
March 2008 19,381 $241,300 $324,860 $485,960
February 2008 18,409 $240,485 $324,925 $479,912
January 2008 17,659 $243,500 $324,962 $481,765
December 2007 18,584 $245,120 $327,975 $489,355
November 2007 19,926 $248,665 $330,475 $486,425
October 2007 20,762 $249,950 $337,260 $493,980
September 2007 20,656 $253,425 $339,900 $497,749
August 2007 19,837 $257,712 $342,975 $499,124
July 2007 18,710 $261,120 $349,120 $499,930
June 2007 17,670 $264,282 $349,950 $507,949
May 2007 16,386 $264,900 $350,975 $512,662
April 2007 15,059 $264,900 $354,740 $517,740
March 2007 13,897 $264,450 $353,850 $523,425
February 2007 13,814 $258,517 $349,800 $516,750
January 2007 13,726 $255,810 $349,637 $507,441
December 2006 14,746 $257,149 $348,246 $499,949
November 2006 15,671 $258,837 $348,750 $499,900
October 2006 16,027 $259,640 $348,834 $499,900
September 2006 15,239 $261,098 $349,675 $499,937
August 2006 14,029 $264,925 $350,737 $518,587
July 2006 12,864 $264,920 $350,470 $525,980
June 2006 11,261 $264,925 $349,975 $530,937
May 2006 9,804 $262,340 $350,940 $532,360
April 2006 8,701 $256,433 $346,433 $526,224

Data on deptofnumbers.com is for informational purposes only. No warranty or guarantee of accuracy is offered or implied. Contact ben@deptofnumbers.com (or @deptofnumbers on Twitter) if you have any questions, comments or suggestions.

 

 

 

Department of Numbers
http://www.deptofnumbers.com/

Asking Prices and Inventory for Homes in Portland Oregon


As of April 08 2013 there were about 8,039 single family and condo homes listed for sale in Portland Oregon. The median asking price of these homes was approximately $274,000. Since this time last year, the inventory of homes for sale has decreased by 24.4% and the median price has increased by 9.6%.

April 08, 2013 Month/Month Year/Year
Median Asking Price $274,000 +3.4% +9.6%
Home Listings/Inventory 8,039 +0.8% -24.4%

Recent Asking Price and Inventory History for Portland

Date Single Family & Condo
Inventory
25th Percentile
Asking Price
Median
Asking Price
75th Percentile
Asking Price
04/08/2013 8,039 $185,000 $274,000 $439,000
04/01/2013 7,836 $185,000 $269,900 $429,900
03/25/2013 7,975 $184,990 $269,900 $429,950
03/18/2013 7,998 $184,900 $269,900 $429,000
03/11/2013 7,979 $181,900 $265,000 $425,000

Portland Asking Price History

The median asking price for homes in Portland peaked in April 2007 at $354,740 and is now $82,790 (23.3%) lower. From a low of $239,125 in February 2011, the median asking price in Portland has increased by $32,825 (13.7%).

25th, Median (50th) and 75th Percentile Asking Prices for Portland Oregon

Portland Housing Inventory History

Housing inventory in Portland, which is typically highest in the spring/summer and lowest in the fall/winter, peaked at 23,354 in July 2008. The lowest housing inventory level seen was 7,938 in April 2013.

Housing Inventory for Portland Oregon

Portland Asking Price and Inventory History

Date Single Family & Condo
Inventory
25th Percentile
Asking Price
Median
Asking Price
75th Percentile
Asking Price
April 2013 7,938 $185,000 $271,950 $434,450
March 2013 7,969 $182,923 $267,425 $427,213
February 2013 7,981 $179,900 $262,450 $419,731
January 2013 8,250 $179,075 $259,217 $404,725
December 2012 8,627 $178,900 $259,720 $405,750
November 2012 9,408 $179,675 $260,950 $408,963
October 2012 10,259 $179,900 $267,160 $418,600
September 2012 10,828 $179,900 $268,975 $418,450
August 2012 11,102 $179,675 $268,725 $418,500
July 2012 11,140 $177,600 $266,598 $411,651
June 2012 11,362 $174,825 $259,675 $399,950
May 2012 11,227 $169,713 $252,463 $399,450
April 2012 10,820 $169,160 $249,910 $397,940
March 2012 9,683 $174,450 $259,450 $406,225
February 2012 10,549 $169,225 $248,250 $388,025
January 2012 10,833 $169,080 $246,960 $381,960
December 2011 11,461 $169,925 $248,375 $385,675
November 2011 12,018 $174,750 $250,972 $397,425
October 2011 12,846 $179,530 $258,720 $399,900
September 2011 13,509 $179,939 $259,900 $399,900
August 2011 14,672 $179,360 $256,590 $395,540
July 2011 14,772 $178,150 $253,188 $389,225
June 2011 14,762 $176,475 $250,970 $386,970
May 2011 14,582 $173,184 $249,160 $375,780
April 2011 14,748 $169,950 $242,400 $364,975
March 2011 15,458 $169,800 $239,675 $359,575
February 2011 15,531 $169,675 $239,125 $354,725
January 2011 15,001 $170,760 $239,158 $356,380
December 2010 16,118 $176,200 $242,700 $363,363
November 2010 17,018 $180,160 $249,330 $373,780
October 2010 17,614 $184,975 $253,375 $381,975
September 2010 18,282 $189,100 $258,925 $390,950
August 2010 18,579 $190,940 $261,150 $397,160
July 2010 18,160 $195,163 $267,475 $399,000
June 2010 17,488 $196,853 $268,875 $399,800
May 2010 17,035 $198,880 $269,620 $399,818
April 2010 17,279 $198,000 $266,750 $392,500
March 2010 16,495 $195,600 $264,460 $393,960
February 2010 15,382 $194,938 $264,450 $395,198
January 2010 14,895 $197,819 $267,425 $399,225
December 2009 15,329 $199,897 $272,038 $402,212
November 2009 15,902 $202,750 $277,760 $417,780
October 2009 16,573 $209,675 $283,646 $428,225
September 2009 17,165 $210,000 $289,475 $436,100
August 2009 17,595 $211,760 $292,880 $444,320
July 2009 17,819 $212,950 $294,950 $449,000
June 2009 17,870 $213,460 $294,920 $449,100
May 2009 17,713 $211,475 $293,291 $445,250
April 2009 17,978 $212,525 $289,925 $444,725
March 2009 18,506 $214,153 $289,930 $443,360
February 2009 18,449 $216,014 $293,968 $448,125
January 2009 18,872 $219,952 $297,855 $452,809
December 2008 19,842 $223,220 $302,773 $458,508
November 2008 20,983 $226,382 $307,532 $464,024
October 2008 22,086 $229,650 $312,450 $469,724
September 2008 22,973 $233,730 $319,580 $474,990
August 2008 23,314 $235,200 $322,000 $475,725
July 2008 23,354 $236,074 $324,550 $475,000
June 2008 22,657 $239,150 $324,920 $479,459
May 2008 21,505 $239,900 $325,000 $480,947
April 2008 20,669 $239,900 $324,937 $479,912
March 2008 19,381 $241,300 $324,860 $485,960
February 2008 18,409 $240,485 $324,925 $479,912
January 2008 17,659 $243,500 $324,962 $481,765
December 2007 18,584 $245,120 $327,975 $489,355
November 2007 19,926 $248,665 $330,475 $486,425
October 2007 20,762 $249,950 $337,260 $493,980
September 2007 20,656 $253,425 $339,900 $497,749
August 2007 19,837 $257,712 $342,975 $499,124
July 2007 18,710 $261,120 $349,120 $499,930
June 2007 17,670 $264,282 $349,950 $507,949
May 2007 16,386 $264,900 $350,975 $512,662
April 2007 15,059 $264,900 $354,740 $517,740
March 2007 13,897 $264,450 $353,850 $523,425
February 2007 13,814 $258,517 $349,800 $516,750
January 2007 13,726 $255,810 $349,637 $507,441
December 2006 14,746 $257,149 $348,246 $499,949
November 2006 15,671 $258,837 $348,750 $499,900
October 2006 16,027 $259,640 $348,834 $499,900
September 2006 15,239 $261,098 $349,675 $499,937
August 2006 14,029 $264,925 $350,737 $518,587
July 2006 12,864 $264,920 $350,470 $525,980
June 2006 11,261 $264,925 $349,975 $530,937
May 2006 9,804 $262,340 $350,940 $532,360
April 2006 8,701 $256,433 $346,433 $526,224

 

 

Department of Numbers

The Department of Numbers contextualizes public data so that individuals can form independent opinions on everyday social and economic matters.

 

3 Common First Time Home Buyer Mistakes Can Cost Thousands, by Steph Noble


Buying real estate for the first time is a very exciting step in life.

It is likely to be one of the biggest financial commitments that you make, so it’s very important to navigate the purchasing process wisely.

Many first-time home buyers make rookie mistakes that bring on negative consequences and a lot of frustration.

Outlined below are common errors home buyers make, so you can learn from their missteps and avoid them yourself.

 

1. Buying More Than What You Can Truly Afford

Just because the bank says that you qualify a certain amount for a mortgage doesn’t mean that you have to choose a house at the very top of this price range.

Many people get carried away and buy the most expensive house that they qualify for.

If something unexpected happens, they may find it difficult to keep up with their monthly mortgage payments later on.

Remember that you will also have student loan payments, vehicle costs, credit card bills, health insurance, groceries, retirement savings and other expenses, so make sure that your mortgage payments will comfortably fit within your budget.

 

2. Failing To Get A Home Inspection

Before buying a house, you should always have a professional inspection done. Not doing so is a big mistake.

You don’t want to get stuck with hidden damage that could saddle you with the expense of ongoing repairs.

Hiring a professional to assess the home’s condition is absolutely essential before making your final decision.

 

3. Disregarding Your Future

When you are buying real estate, don’t just think about how the home will work for you in the immediate future.

Also consider what your needs will be five, ten or even 20 years from now.

Find out the development plans for the neighborhood.

Look for reputable schools if you intend to start a family.

And consider whether the street’s home values are likely to increase or decline in the future.

 

Your Next Steps

Don’t let the home-buying process overwhelm you!

Learn from these common first-time home buyers’ mistakes, so you can avoid them.

A great next step toward planning for your first home purchase is to consult with a trusted, licensed mortgage professional who is trained in providing the best advice on how a new home will affect your budget.

 

 

Steph Noble
http://stephnoblemortgageblog.com/

3 Tips To Get The Best Results On Your Mortgage Application, by Steph Noble


Although the financial markets have tightened lending guidelines and financing requirements over the last few years, the right advice when applying for your loan can make a big difference.

 

Not all loans are approved. And even when they aren’t approved immediately, it doesn’t have to be the end of your real estate dreams.

There are many reasons why a mortgage loan for the purchase of your real estate could be declined.

Here are a few things to understand and prepare for when applying for a mortgage:

 

Loan-to-Value Ratio

The loan-to-value ratio (LTV) is the percentage of the appraised value of the real estate that you are trying to finance.

For example, if you are trying to finance a home that costs $100,000, and want to borrow $75,000, your LTV is 75%.

Lenders generally don’t like a high LTV ratio. The higher the ratio, the harder it normally is to qualify for a mortgage.

You can positively affect the LTV by saving for a larger down payment.

 

Credit-to-Debt Ratio

Your credit score can be affected negatively, which in turn affects your mortgage loan if you have a high credit-to-debt ratio.

The ratio is figured by dividing the amount of credit available to you on a credit card or auto loan, and dividing it by how much you are currently owe.

High debt loads make a borrower less attractive to many lenders.

Try to keep your debt to under 50% of what is available to you. Lenders will appreciate it, and you will be more likely to get approved for a mortgage.

 

No Credit or Bad Credit

Few things can derail your mortgage loan approval like negative credit issues.

Having no credit record can sometimes present as much difficulty with your loan approval as having negative credit.

With no record of timely loan payments in your credit history, a lender is unable to determine your likelihood to repay the new mortgage.

Some lenders and loan programs may consider other records of payment, like utility bills and rent reports from your landlord.

Talk to your loan officer to determine which of these issues might apply to you, and take the steps to correct them.

Then, you can finance the home of your dreams.